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Detentions of Valarmathi & Vettivel Jasikaran and Chandana Sirimalwatte: Sri Lanka uses emergenc...

Mar 8, 2011 11:23:58 PM- transcurrents.com

Forgotten Prisoners

Thousands of people are languishing in detention without charge or trial under Sri Lanka's repressive anti-terrorism laws. Sometimes held in secret prisons, they are vulnerable to a whole range of abuses, including torture or being killed in custody.

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Kawya Rathnayaka, daughter of Chandana Sirimalwatte, an editor of a local opposition newspaper who was arrested in January 2010, holds a picture of her father during a rally calling for more freedom of expression and protection for the media in Colombo on February 8, 2010. ~ Pic Reuters via HRW

By Amnesty International - The film focuses on specific cases of detentions in Sri Lanka:

On 6 March 2008, the police Terrorist Investigation Division (TID) arrested Vettivel Jasikaran. After nearly six months' detention without charge, Vettivel Jasikaran was indicted on 27 August 2008 for "inciting communal disharmony" by printing, publishing and distributing the magazine North Eastern Monthly. Valarmathi was charged with aiding and abetting her husband.

On 29 January 2010, officers with the police Criminal Investigation Department (CID) broke into the premises of the Lanka Irida newspaper and arrested its Chief Editor, Chandana Sirimalwatte.

[Scribd document] Amnesty International: Forgotten prisoners: Sri Lanka uses anti-terrorism laws to detain thousands

Thousands of people are languishing in detention without charge or trial under Sri Lanka’s repressive anti-terrorism laws. Sometimes held in secret prisons, they are vulnerable to a whole range of abuses, including torture or being killed in custody. Sri Lanka has been under a state of emergency almost continually since 1971. Successive governments have used national security as an excuse to introduce a range of broad and often confusing emergency regulations. [AI]